vitamin c and common cold pdf

Vitamin C And Common Cold Pdf

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Excerpts from Vitamin C and the Common Cold by Linus Pauling

To investigate whether vitamin C is effective in the treatment of the common cold. Extra doses of vitamin C could benefit some patients who contract the common cold despite taking daily vitamin C supplements. The common cold, known simply as a cold, is defined as an upper respiratory tract infection URTI caused by various viruses, characterized by symptoms like coughing or sneezing, sore throat, stuffy or runny nose, headache, fever, muscle aches or aching limbs, and so on [ 1 , 2 ]. However, because of similar symptoms, there is no way of distinguishing among the different types of common cold, other URTIs, and influenza in most cases. With regard to virology and pathophysiology, URTIs are a group of diseases in the broad sense, including common cold, viral pharyngitis, laryngitis, herpangina, pharyngoconjunctival fever, and bacterial pharyngotonsillitis, rather than a single diagnosable disease [ 3 ]. Influenza is highly contagious, with serious systemic symptoms and mild respiratory symptoms; its peak prevalence is in winter and spring; there are also global outbreaks and epidemics periodically [ 9 — 12 ].

Thank you for visiting nature. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer. In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript. A village in Akita prefecture, one of the regions in Japan with the highest mortality from gastric cancer. Participants in annual screening programs for circulatory diseases conducted under the National Health and Welfare Services Law for the Aged, and diagnosed as having atrophic gastritis. During the supplementation phase, 61 dropped out, and completed the trial.

Preventing the common cold with a vitamin C supplement: A double-blind, placebo-controlled survey

Medwave se preocupa por su privacidad y la seguridad de sus datos personales. It is generally believed that the consumption of vitamin C prevents its appearance, but the actual efficacy of this measure is controversial. We extracted data from the systematic reviews, reanalyzed data of primary studies, conducted a meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table using the GRADE approach. We concluded the consumption of vitamin C does not prevent the incidence of common cold. The common cold is one of the most common diseases in the general population. The term "common cold" does not refer to a specific condition, but to a group of symptoms such as nasal obstruction, sore throat, cough, lethargy and asthenia, with or without fever.

Vitamin C and Common Cold

One hundred sixty-eight volunteers were randomized to receive a placebo or a vitamin C supplement, two tablets daily, over a day period between November and February. They used a five-point scale to assess their health and recorded any common cold infections and symptoms in a daily diary. Consequently, volunteers in the active group were less likely to get a cold and recovered faster if infected.

Meeting the recommended levels of intake for all essential micronutrients is important for optimal immune function see Immunity In-brief article. When it comes to the common cold specifically, there is evidence that routine supplementation with vitamin C can reduce the occurrence and duration of the common cold in certain individuals. Use of oral zinc lozenges may influence cold symptoms and duration, but there are important caveats associated with their use. The common cold is a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract nose and throat.

Effect of vitamin C on common cold: randomized controlled trial

Stanford, Calif. This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. To the Editor.

I have, however, formulated the hypothesis which has not yet been tested by experiment that the effectiveness of ascorbic acid in providing protection against viral diseases results from its function in the synthesis and activity of interferon in preventing the entry of virus particles into the cells. The discovery of interferon was reported in by Isaacs and Lindenmann. It is a protein that is produced by cells infected by a virus and that has the property of spreading to neighboring cells and changing them in such a way as to enable them to resist infection. In this way the interferon ameliorates the disease. I estimate that for many people 1 g [gram] to 2 g per day mg to mg per day is approximately the optimum rate of ingestion. There is evidence that some people remain in very good health, including freedom from the common cold, year after year, through the ingestion of only mg of ascorbic acid per day.

Please note: This information was current at the time of publication. But medical information is always changing, and some information given here may be out of date. For regularly updated information on a variety of health topics, please visit familydoctor. See related article on treatment of the common cold. Most colds don't cause serious illness and will get better over time. Adults can treat cold symptoms with over-the-counter medicines. Talk to your doctor about what is best for you.

Common Cold

Vitamin C and the Common Cold is a popular book by Linus Pauling , first published in , on vitamin C , its interactions with common cold and the role of vitamin C megadosage in human health. A Nobel Prize-winning chemist and activist, Pauling promoted a view of vitamin C that is strongly at odds with most of the scientific community, which found little evidence for the alleged health benefits of greatly increased vitamin C intake. The book characterizes the inability of humans and some other animals to produce vitamin C in terms of evolution and Pauling's concept of "molecular disease" first articulated in his study, " Sickle Cell Anemia, a Molecular Disease ". Pauling argues that the loss of vitamin C synthesis first arose as a molecular disease, because of a genetic mutation that resulted in the loss of the biochemical capacity to make the vitamin, but because diets of the primate ancestors of humans consisted of high levels of vitamin C from plant sources, the loss of that biochemical mechanism was not harmful and may have even been beneficial. He argues, however, that the subsequent shift to a high-meat, lower-plant diet resulted in widespread vitamin C deficiency.

Huge doses of vitamin C, from one to ten grams daily, are recommended by some scientists as a treatment for and preventative against the common cold. But the prolonged use of such large doses may be dangerous, because there is evidence that breakdown products of vitamin C formed in the body for instance, oxalic acid are a threat to health. Also large doses of the vitamin can enhance the dangerous effects of certain toxic substances in food. It would obviously be both easier and safer for the public to take vitamin C in the smaller quantities in which it is found in certain foodstuffs. Citrus fruits, such as oranges and lemons and also blackcurrants, are particularly rich in vitamin C, the average orange containing about 30mg. Report bugs here.

3 comments

Santosh R.

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DarГ­a L.

PDF | The effect of vitamin C on the common cold has been the subject of several studies. These studies do not support a considerable decrease in the | Find.

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Riegathenma

PDF | Background: The role of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) in the prevention and treatment of the common cold has been a subject of controversy for 60 | Find.

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