past simple present perfect simple and continuous exercises pdf

Past Simple Present Perfect Simple And Continuous Exercises Pdf

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They all live in Chicago. I prefer watching TV. Leave this field empty.

The present perfect continuous tense is used to talk about more temporary actions and situations; the present perfect tense is used to talk about longer-lasting or permanent situations. Complete the dialogue by putting the verbs into the present perfect simple or the present perfect continuous. Present perfect simple or continuous For pre intermediate students.

Present Simple, Present Continuous, Present Perfect Simple, Past Simple

PDF book 1: English tenses exercises. PDF book 2: English grammar exercises. PDF book 3: English grammar rules. Read more about English grammar books PDF on e-grammar. Present perfect simple Exercise 1 Correct mistakes. Present perfect Exercise 2 Complete sentences two parts. Present perfect Exercise 3 Multiple choice two parts. Present perfect Exercise 4 Match sentences.

Present perfect Exercise 5 Make negative sentences. Present perfect Exercise 6 Complete questions. Present perfect dialogue Exercise 11 Complete he dialogue. Present perfect - signal words Exercise 12 Multiple choice. Present perfect simple exercises PDF Worksheet 1 - 6 with answers. Present perfect continuous exercises PDF Worksheet 1 - 5 with answers.

Present perfect simple and continuous exercises PDF Worksheet 1 - 7 with answers. Present perfect and past simple exercises PDF Worksheet 1 - 5 with answers. Negative question: Have you not bought? Haven't you bought? This tense is made with the present simple form of the verb to have have, has and the past participle cooked, written.

It is similar to other perfect tenses. We use the present perfect simple for activities or states that started in the past and still continue. We have lived here since She has known me for more than two years. I haven't seen her since Christmas. How long have they been here? It is often used with expressions indicating that the activities come up to now, such as: for 10 years, since , all week, all the time, always, lately, recently We have always worked in York. We still work in York. It has been quite cold lately.

It is still cold. If the activity started and ended in the past we cannot use the present perfect. I have smoked for 5 years. I smoked for 5 years. We use it to describe some experience that happened in the past the time is not given , but the effects are important now.

She has been to London. And so she knows London. Compare: I have already been to Greece. I have been in Greece for two weeks. When we use this tense to express some experience, we can use following adverbs - ever, never, already, often, occassionaly, yet, before Have you ever tried it?

She has never read this book. We haven't seen it yet. Have you fallen off a bike yet? I haven't met her before. It is used for activities that have a present result.

The bus hasn't arrived. It did not arrived on time and we are still waiting now. I have bought a new house. I did it last month and it means that now I have a new address.

For such activities we often use these adverbs - yet, already, just. They haven't finished their homework yet. They can't go out now. Has she signed it yet? Can I take the document? I've already sent the letter. There is no need to go to the post-office.

We have just heard the news. We know about it. With the present perfect tense we do not specify when the action happened. We say that something happened and it is important now. The time of the action is not relevant. If we give the time or it is clear from the context, we must use the past simple tense.

The time of the action is relevant. Have you had breakfast? But: Did you have breakfast at the hotel? I've read your letter. But: I read your letter last night. They have told me. But: They told me when we met. Have you had the operation? But: When did you have the operation?

The present perfect tense is used for actions that began in the past and continue at present. It expresses how long the action has been. The present simple is used for actions that are repeated at present.

It expresses how often the action happens. She has worked here for a long time. But: She works here every day. How long have you worked here? But: How often do you work here? Positive statement: I have been cooking, He has been cooking Negative statement: I have not been writing I haven't been writing , He has not been writing Question: Have you been playing?

Negative question: Have you not been buying? Haven't you been buying? This tense is made with the present simple form of the verb to have have, has , the past participle of the verb to be been and the present participle playing, doing. It is similar to the future perfect continuous and past perfect continuous. We use the present perfect continuous for events that began at a point of time, are continuing now and will probably continue in the future.

I have been playing tennis since I was 6 years old. She has been working here for 15 years. We use it for actions that began in the past and have only just finished.

I've been skiing all day. I'm so tired. We've been waiting for you since 5 o'clock. In some situations we can use both tenses and there is practically no difference in meaning.

The continuous tense is more usual in English than the simple tense. It has rained for a long time. It has been raining for a long time. Verbs which can be used in this way include - learn, live, sleep, rain, sit, work, wait , stay Sometimes the simple tense can describe a permanent state, while the continuous tense a temporary activity. I have lived here for ten years. It is my permanent address.

Present Simple, Present Continuous, Present Perfect Simple, Past Simple

PDF book 1: English tenses exercises. PDF book 2: English grammar exercises. PDF book 3: English grammar rules. Read more about English grammar books PDF on e-grammar. Present perfect simple Exercise 1 Correct mistakes.

The simple past , past simple or past indefinite , sometimes called the preterite , is the basic form of the past tense in Modern English. It is used principally to describe events in the past, although it also has some other uses. Regular English verbs form the simple past in -ed ; however, there are a few hundred irregular verbs with different forms. The term " simple " is used to distinguish the syntactical construction whose basic form uses the plain past tense alone, from other past tense constructions which use auxiliaries in combination with participles, such as the past perfect and past progressive. Regular verbs form the simple past end -ed ; however there are a few hundred irregular verbs with different forms.

Are … coming 4. Ted is taking a shower right now. My school begins at nine every day. I am not solving some math problems at the moment. Present simple vs present continuous — use. Free interactive exercises to practice online or download as pdf to print. Download this exercise in PDF.

Simple past

In addition, we also have over interactive PDF ESL worksheets, breakout room activities and games for online English teachers to use in their classes. On each page of the website, you will find high-quality and professional ESL teaching activities both free and paid. You can use hundreds of our teaching resources for free, without the need to sign up.

1 comments

Lydia B.

I've been waiting here for ten minutes. Your eyes are red. You haven't been crying, have you? Twitter Share English exercise ".

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