between husband and wife pdf

Between Husband And Wife Pdf

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Background This paper compares husband and wife reports of wife beating using household survey data collected from poor Palestinian refugee communities in Lebanon. Methods The analyses are based on a matched data file of currently married couples, drawn from a unique multi-purpose living conditions sample survey of about Palestinian refugee households interviewed in the spring and summer of

Rights And Obligations Between Husband And Wife

Background This paper compares husband and wife reports of wife beating using household survey data collected from poor Palestinian refugee communities in Lebanon. Methods The analyses are based on a matched data file of currently married couples, drawn from a unique multi-purpose living conditions sample survey of about Palestinian refugee households interviewed in the spring and summer of Four outcomes ever beaten, last year beating, beating during pregnancy, and injuries caused by beating were analysed using Kappa statistics and per cent agreement.

Logistic regression was used to analyse discordant reporting of wife beating during the year preceding the survey. Prevalence estimates of domestic violence are also remarkably similar. However, care should be taken in studies of young men's current beating behaviour using only their self-reports. Wife beating and other forms of physical abuse of women by husbands, especially in developing countries' context, have received increased attention in recent years. Yet, the reliability of spouses, especially men, in providing accurate answers on such sensitive topics has important methodological, practical and substantive implications.

If men could be used as reliable informants on domestic violence it provides great opportunities for posing subjective attitudinal questions to them directly, for they are the perpetrators of violence. In order to effectively tackle problems of domestic violence, victims and perpetrators should be included in any analysis of the topic. Furthermore, the organizational and logistical requirements in field operations, of especially large surveys, are much less when a proxy respondent is used instead of self-reporting, with clear implications for data quality.

This paper examines agreements between husbands and wives on self-reports of domestic violence in poor refugee communities in Lebanon, using unique household survey data collected in The survey included two different questionnaires for married men and women with similar questions on domestic violence.

A total of matched reports were retrieved and constructed in a single data file, providing a unique opportunity to assess agreement between husbands and wives on reports of domestic violence.

An evaluation of spousal overall agreement regarding reports of ever-beaten, incidence of beating during last year and when pregnant, and if beaten, reports on injuries if any, was first undertaken. Second, the association between spousal disagreement regarding last year beating and selected covariates was examined. Given the prevailing patriarchal norms and gender inequity in the refugee camps, we expect little difference between husbands and wives in reporting episodes of domestic violence.

Arguably, wife beating is a socially accepted behaviour in impoverished communities in this context, particularly among the older generations of men. We used data from the Living Conditions household sample survey, covering all Palestinian refugee camps and small communities of refugees in Lebanon.

The survey was based on a one-stage probability sample of households drawn from a sampling frame containing complete listings of households, largely constructed as part of the survey preparatory phase. The survey was carried out during the spring and summer of by the Palestinian Bureau of Statistics in collaboration with the Oslo-based Institute of Applied Social Science, Fafo. Female interviewers were recruited and thoroughly trained before conducting face-to-face interviews with selected households.

The demographic and health data appear to be of good quality, with an overall response rate of The Whipple Index of preference for zero or five was , indicating a slight heaping.

Although some digit preference occurred, the quality of age reporting was generally good. The Myers' Blended Index of digit preference was 4. Furthermore, age in completed years and year of birth were virtually complete. Other variables were generally well reported, with low levels of non-response. Issues of data quality pertaining to demographic and health indicators were discussed in more detail elsewhere.

The survey was conducted in two stages. In the first stage, the household questionnaire, containing questions about the household as a whole as well as about each of its members i. In the second stage, interviews were conducted with eligible respondents for the remaining two questionnaires: randomly selected adults and ever-married women if any questionnaires.

We followed a systematic random sampling procedure to select one adult from each household as described in Deming. She then used a specially constructed sampling sheet to make a list of all adults usually living in the household, ordered by gender and descending age. For each line on this list, there may or may not be a pre-printed X, marking a randomly selected person. The interviewer was instructed to start at the bottom of the list, and select the first line with an X. This was the randomly selected person.

Our strategy was to construct a matched-couple data file from these two questionnaires containing reports of domestic violence items by husbands and wives.

The steps followed in matching the files are displayed in Figure 1. As shown in the Figure, eligible married men were initially selected from the RSI file containing one adult from each household and then matched with their wives in the EM women file containing all ever-married women in each household.

This is because only men were asked the domestic violence questions in the RSI file but all ever-married women were asked the same questions in the EM women file. The remaining filtering criteria were fairly similar in both questionnaires. The questionnaires included filtering questions at the beginning of the domestic violence module with written instructions to skip the whole module if any of the above-mentioned individuals were present and listening.

The filtering questions for eligibility were not asked of the respondents but were completed by the interviewers during the interview visit.

Interviewers were instructed to stress confidentiality of responses and to read a statement of informed consent before proceeding to ask the domestic violence questions of eligible adults. Thus, from a total of men and women in the RSI file, Of the selected men, Among these married men, 17 1.

From the men selected, From the remaining men, 8 were excluded because they were not the spouse or the head of the family. The final men The EM file initially contained a total of women note that on average a household had more than one ever-married woman.

Next, we filtered out women who could not be interviewed alone, or in the presence of somebody who was not listening, for the domestic violence module. Note that in the matching operation, every married man selected should have been matched with his spouse because all ever-married women in each household were interviewed. However, in the final matching, a total of 47 men could not be matched with their spouses because 43 A final sample of matched reports from husbands and wives was retrieved.

The matched couples sample may not be representative of the original sample of married women and men, and thus of the population of interest.

For this reason, demographic characteristics such as age, education level, region of residence, and health perception of the matched couples were compared with current married men and women in the original populations. Results showed that the selected sample of husbands and wives was remarkably similar to the original one, especially for men.

However, some differences were noticed for women, with the selected sample having slightly younger mean age The outcome variable of interest is agreement on four domestic violence items, obtained independently from husbands and wives. Information on ever beating, last year beating, beating during pregnancy, and injuries caused by beating were included. Agreement was defined as reporting no-no and yes-yes, while disagreement consisted of yes-no and no-yes.

A large number of predictors were initially considered for analysis, but only a few meaningful ones were included owing to the lack of association with the outcome variable. Of particular importance to this study was men's age, indexing generational shifts concerning patriarchy and social acceptance of wife beating more generally.

The 5-year difference in ages of women and men was chosen to preserve enough cases and also because it represents the average age gap between spouses in this context. We used Kappa statistics and per cent agreement between husbands' and wives' self reports to assess quality of agreement between husbands and wives for different outcomes: ever beaten, last year beating, beating during pregnancy, and injuries caused by beating.

Kappa ranges from 0 in case of no agreement at all to 1. In the analysis, we distinguished between four different possibilities for each outcome variable: wife-yes husband-yes, wife-no husband-no, wife-yes husband-no, and wife-no husband-yes. Therefore consistency, rather than accuracy, was assessed. A model with age of men was first estimated to test the influence of generation on discordant reporting of wife beating, followed by models that added successive covariates one at a time.

Low statistical significance was expected however because of the small sample size. The majority of couples agreed on reports of wife beating, regardless of the indicator used Table 1.

There were some disagreements, however, especially on reports of ever being beaten. Overall, Of these, There was disagreement in The prevalence estimates for the three remaining indicators are smaller, and fairly similar to each other, whether based on husbands or wives' reports. When asked whether they were beaten during the past year, An estimated prevalence of Disagreement is not large, and about 2. Thus, the differences in reporting between spouses were very small, and in Likewise, small differences between spouses were observed for reporting beating during pregnancy 6.

Thus, there was slightly more agreement on wife beating either occurring in the recent past last year or resulting in injuries than on beatings occurring sometime in the most distant past i. The bivariate associations, reported in Table 2 , indicated that age of women and marital duration had statistically significant association with discordant reporting.

However, these two variables are strongly associated with each other, and the effect of marital duration may reflect respondents' age. Surprisingly, education was not a significant predictor of disagreement for either wives or husbands. The final logistic regression analysis considered the simultaneous influence of these variables on discordant reporting in couples. Based on the results of the bivariate analysis, the strategy followed was to fit a series of nested models, testing the likely impact of all covariates, one at a time, on the influence of men's age on the outcome variable.

The findings reported in Table 3 confirmed our expectations that men's age plays a pivotal role in discordant reporting. As shown in the Table, the unadjusted OR indicated that only couples with younger men and short marital duration had statistically significant associations with discordant reporting.

However, the second model with adjusted OR shows that only couples with younger men aged 20—29 were 4. Adjusting for other variables did not diminish the significance of this variable in predicting discordant reporting. Although the OR for the remaining covariates were consistent with the findings presented previously, none of them was statistically significant at the conventional level of 0.

The slight change in the OR for men's age across the two models reflects possible association i. Comparisons between the nested models using likelihood ratio statistics data not shown confirmed that none of the additional models improved the fit significantly. Thus, the model with men's age only was chosen as the best fitting model to account for variations in discordant reporting of wife beating. Although other variables e.

Adjusted and unadjusted odds ratios OR from logistic regression models of discordant reporting of last year beaten by refugee couples in Lebanon.

Humor Styles in Marriage: How Similar Are Husband and Wife?

A spouse is a significant other in a marriage , civil union , or common-law marriage. The term is gender neutral , whereas a male spouse is a husband and a female spouse is a wife. Although a spouse is a form of significant other , the latter term also includes non-marital partners who play a social role similar to that of a spouse, but do not have rights and duties reserved by law to a spouse. The legal status of a spouse, and the specific rights and obligations associated with that status, vary significantly among the jurisdictions of the world. These regulations are usually described in family law statutes. However, in many parts of the world, where civil marriage is not that prevalent, there is instead customary marriage, which is usually regulated informally by the community.

Between husband & wife : gospel perspectives on marital intimacy

Furthermore, any life insurance policy of which a married woman is the beneficiary may be assigned and it may be surrendered with the consent of the person. Marriages of Portsmouth Virginia Bank v. Hastzngs Car Alart tlD64] It is also about getting

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly. DOI: Past research found that similar appreciation for humor exists between spouses, but it is not certain whether this similarity between spouses also exists in kindhearted or malicious humor. View on SAGE.

Background This paper compares husband and wife reports of wife beating using household survey data collected from poor Palestinian refugee communities in Lebanon. Methods The analyses are based on a matched data file of currently married couples, drawn from a unique multi-purpose living conditions sample survey of about Palestinian refugee households interviewed in the spring and summer of Four outcomes ever beaten, last year beating, beating during pregnancy, and injuries caused by beating were analysed using Kappa statistics and per cent agreement. Logistic regression was used to analyse discordant reporting of wife beating during the year preceding the survey. Prevalence estimates of domestic violence are also remarkably similar.

Humor Styles in Marriage: How Similar Are Husband and Wife?

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Joana M.

The modern concept of family is far more encompassing than in past decades.

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RenГ© B.

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